March 07, 2012

Algae and Morgellons: is there a link?

Another research about Morgellons links the desease to some species of Algae: probably Algae are not a causative agent, but just something that maybe has a relation with symptoms. Some researchers think that Algae, Fungi and Bacteria are copyed by nanostructures in the fibers. These fibers, quoted in the article and found in Morgellons sufferers, are biotechnological materials, as Sofia Smallstorm demonstrated.

There are six particle types that are consistently recovered from the skin surface of those suffering from Morgellons disease, 1) ribbon-like fibers, 2) rounded fibers, 3) capsule-like particles, 4) black flakes/grains, 5) worm-like particles, and 6) stellate-shaped (“starfish-shaped”) particles. The fibers are often pigmented and may luminesce under ultraviolet light.

Current Morgellons research at a laboratory in Massachusetts shows that individuals affected by Morgellons disease have been in contact with soil and/or water containing cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), algae, aquatic fungi, water molds and lichen (algae and fungi). This assemblage of organisms and associated bacterial populations, is common in soil and aquatic environments where cryptobiotic soils are present and/or in environments where nutrient rich conditions promote the development of algae blooms.

Dermal contact with a water source and/or inhalation of aerial dust containing cyanobacteria and algae may lead to the progressive colonization of organisms that are capable of feeding on or consuming these photosynthetic producers, thus contributing to the wide range of symptoms reported by Morgellons sufferers. Incidental growth of these opportunistic populations, such as actinomyces, aquatic fungi and true fungi, are known to promote disease in humans, as they consist of species capable of degrading either cellulose or keratin (skin/hair). Evidence for the presence of opportunistic micro- organisms in samples is indicated by the occurrence of capsule-like Morgellons particles that have been identified as parasitized pine pollen grains. Chytrid populations are obligate parasites of frogs, nematodes, algae, cyanobacteria plants and pine pollen.

These findings serve as a focus for further understanding the ecological significance of the organisms identified in this study and the rôle they may play as causative agents of Morgellons disease.


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